Here at the Pay and Conditions for Higher Education Workers website we bring you all the information you might need as a potential or current higher education worker regarding your pay levels and conditions of service.

The collection of evidence, ideas and supporting material from individuals and organisations with an interest in higher education is an ongoing process, and so we welcome any feedback you may have regarding your own experiences in higher education employment.

Welcome to the Pay and Conditions for Higher Education Workers website. We hope to provide you all the information you might need as a current or prospective higher education worker to enable you to review and assess pay levels, pay structures, conditions of service, and future means of determining these, for both academic and non-academic higher education staff.

Pay and Conditions for Higher Education Workers, Pay Levels, Pay Structures

Welcome to the Pay and Conditions for Higher Education Workers website. We aim to address the main issues of pay levels for the various groups of higher education staff (relative to each other and to external comparators, and their adequacy for recruitment and retention of sufficient staff of the right quality), and difficulties associated with existing pay structures.

We also hope to draw attention to issues arising from the diversity of institutions' missions, and the variety of terms and conditions of service for different groups of staff; and to concerns about staff training and development, increasing casualisation (greater use of fixed-term contracts and more part-time working), equal opportunities, and the capacity of human resources management in the sector.

Of these the core issue is the examination of pay rates and earnings levels for all groups of staff employed by higher education institutions, including of relativities between them and with external comparators, with particular reference to the implications for recruitment, retention and motivation, and also taking account of issues concerning affordability and institutional efficiency. This should hopefully lead to assessment of the case for harmonisation and rationalisation of pay scales across universities with different heritages and between different staff groups, taking into account the autonomy of HEIs and the diversity of their missions.